Adam Grant

Adam Grant

2016 Session | Women, Work and Life: How to Give and Take

Women do the lion’s share of helping, mentoring, and office housework. Adam Grant, Wharton’s top-rated professor and coauthor with Sheryl Sandberg of the New York Times series on women and work, will explore how to contribute to others without sacrificing yourself. Using surprising studies and actionable cases, Adam will cover how to be generous without burning out and getting burned, so that no good deed goes punished. Read More

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In Praise of First Jobs

Even mindless first jobs can prove to be invaluable experiences. How else would some of us know how to carry six plates at a time or fold sweaters so neatly? On a more serious note, starter stints can teach useful lessons about people, ourselves and the nature of work. Check out what initiated some of our 2016 speakers into the world of gainful employment—and what they learned. Read More

Adam Grant on the Kind of Giving That Gets You Ahead

Grant, Adam 200x238Being Masters-of-the-Universe-ruthless is so last century. Now, most of us know that nice guys (and gals) do come in first, more so than cutthroats, thanks to Adam Grant’s New York Times bestseller Give and Take. And soon, with the February release of his new book, Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, we’ll stop suppressing our maverick sides, too. Here, the Wharton professor talks about the kind of giving that gets you ahead, good karma and the best office holiday gifts. Read More

CFW SURVEY: ‘I Care’ and the Other Reasons You Do ‘Office Housework’

stock 853Editing a colleague’s report, taking meeting notes, refilling the printer paper tray—the non-job-description stuff you do at work to help someone, your team or the company at large has a name. “Office housework”—and as at home, the bulk of it falls to women, who mostly do it to little acknowledgment, let alone acclaim, reported Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant in a recent New York Times article. What’s more, they say, it’s another example of gender bias: Men are praised and rewarded if they pitch in, while women are penalized for not helping.

But is office housework that widespread a burden and do women do it because we have to? We asked our readers and a whopping 2,218 of you responded. You have strong feelings about the topic, ranging from resentment to bemusement. Here’s what you said: Read More

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