Financial Fitness

Free Teleclass | Retire with Enough Money: Strategies for Making Your Money Last

Teresa GhilarducciRetire with Enough Money: Strategies for Making Your Money Last
Tuesday, November 29, 2016
1:00-1:30pm Eastern

Eventbrite - Retire with Enough Money: Strategies for Making Your Money Last (Free Teleclass with Teresa Ghilarducci)
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Are You Ready to Retire?

angela-foreshaw-rouseAngela Foreshaw-Rouse, Manager, State Operations and Community Outreach, AARP Pennsylvania

If you’re female and a Gen Xer (age 35 to 54), chances are you’re nowhere near having enough money for your future golden years. A recent GoBankingRates survey found that a mere 26 percent of women have saved more than $50,000 for retirement while more than half of Gen Xers have either no retirement savings or less than $10,000. Read More

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Three Smart Things to Do—or Not Do—with Your Money

quinn-jane-bryant-200Let’s be clear from the get-go: “Women are not any better or worse than men at managing their finances,” says Jane Bryant Quinn, a personal finance expert and author of How to Make Your Money Last: The Indispensable Retirement Guide. “For example, it’s been reported that women are more conservative investors than men [so they, in effect, are preserving wealth rather than building it], but when you look at women who have actual investing experience, they are not more risk averse.”

Perhaps the only difference between the sexes is that women are more willing to read articles on how to do things better. Here, the three most common mistakes that people make. Read More

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Podcast: Put Your Personal Vision of Prosperity into Action

Kueng-Rogin

Get ready to feel more excited than ever about your money—and about all the good things it can bring. In this 30-minute talk, Ellen Rogin and Lisa Keung,co-authors of Picture Your Prosperity, will show you how to design your investments to create the life you envision.

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Small Attitude Changes, Big Money Impact

Kerry-Hannon-head-shot-220x300A fact of life they didn’t tell you middle school: You’ll likely be flying solo at some point during your retirement, if not at the start. “From the age of 65 to the end of life, most American women are single, and if they lost a partner, their standard of living drops,” says Kerry Hannon, a retirement and personal finance expert and author most recently of Love Your Job: The New Rules for Career Happiness. Yet on any given day, “women will talk about health before they’ll talk about wealth,” Hannon notes. Making financial security a priority in our thoughts—as well as a part of our conversations—is one attitude adjustment we all need to make. These five will also help ensure that the retirement years are truly golden:

#1 Get self-centered

Nature or nurture, women tend to put the needs of others first, and as a result, we experience career interruptions that lead to our missing out on raises, years of contributions to employer-sponsored retirement plans and reported earnings that will affect the size of our Social Security checks down the line. To even begin to make up for the losses, “you need to pay yourself first—which means put money in savings before you do anything else with your paycheck,” Hannon says. And when it comes to opportunities at work, which that taking-care-of-yourself attitude could position you for a promotion and higher salary, “by all means, as Sheryl Sandberg put it, lean in.”

#2 Stop using fuzzy numbers

“You need a solid understanding of how much you spend now to determine exactly how much you’ll need later in life,” Hannon says. You also can’t make sure you’re living within your means unless you run real numbers. Hannon recommends going to Mint.com and YouNeedaBudget.com for help tracking your spending and penciling out a budget.

#3 Be bold about saving

Afraid that they’ll need the money, many people who participate in their 401(k) plans allocate just fractions of their paycheck to it. “But at the very least, you should be putting in the 4% to 6% that employers typically require to get the maximum company match,” Hannon says. “It’s pre-tax, so you’ll hardly miss it.” An even better target savings amount: 10% that you eventually dial up to 15%—or more, if you’re getting a late start.

#4 Invest with confidence

“While most women are completely comfortable dealing with their daily finances, many are intimidated by stocks and bonds,” Hannon observes. The only solution is to get educated about investing and retirement planning. Hannon recommends checking out Iinvest.org, WiserWomen.org, Learnvest.com and Dailyworth.com—the latter three specifically geared to women. It may also be helpful to have a professional explain things. If you do go the financial-advisor route, Hannon suggests hiring one that charges a flat fee. Interview a few (there are searchable databases at sites of the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors, the Financial Planning Association and the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards), find one you like and don’t be timid about asking questions. It’s your money, after all.

#5 Look forward to your 50s

In order to keep on working and earning, many women shift career tracks as the nest starts to empty out, or a life or health crisis pushes them to find work with meaning or a job that they’re passionate about. “It often takes about three to five years to get something new going full speed, so at 50, you might start thinking about what you want to do when you’re 55,” Hannon says. “Begin to add the necessary certifications or degrees, research and even moonlight to see if it truly is something you want to do in this chapter.”

Also, since money is often the biggest stumbling block to changing careers—you may have to take a pay cut—you should “get financially fit, sock away savings, pay down debts and perhaps downsize your home,” Hannon advises. You’ll feel challenged during those transitional years but remember, “you’re not reinventing yourself; you’re redeploying the skills you already have in your kit. It’s also an exciting time, so go slow and take it in baby steps,” Hannon adds.

Finally, to get your friends to join you in thinking and talking about money matters, Hannon recommends adding personal finance books to your book club’s reading list. Her top picks: The Charles Schwab Guide to Finances After 50, Get a Financial Life and Jonathon Clements Money Guide 2015.

Kerry Hannon will be leading panel discussion “Reviving a Stalled Career” at the the 2015 Pennsylvania Conference for Women.

READ MORE FROM THIS MONTH’S NEWSLETTER

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Best Reads for Staying on Top of Every Industry
About Face: Taking Your Career in a New Direction
Career Advice You Can Bank on

Posted in blog, Speaker Articles, Financial Fitness

Podcast: Take Control of Your Financial Future

Manisha ThakorIf you’ve ever wished someone would just make the world of investing simple and understandable, this is the podcast for you. In 30 minutes, women’s investment expert Manisha Thakor will give you a powerful five-point framework that you can use to get started – or continue – investing. Listen or read the complete transcript below.
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Free Teleclass: Take Control of Your Financial Future

Manisha ThakorTake Control of Your Financial Future
Tuesday, May 19, 2015
1:00-1:30pm EDT

REGISTER HERE

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5 Big Money Decisions Made Easy

Manisha ThakorEven people who like math can struggle with major financial decisions. “The problem is that many of us don’t have a simple mental framework for how to allocate our income, and absent it, we can’t tell if we’re going off the reservation,” says Manisha Thakor, director of wealth strategies for women at The BAM Alliance and co-author of On My Own Two Feet: A Modern Girl’s Guide to Personal Finance. She recommends putting 50% of your paycheck toward needs, 30% toward wants and 20% toward savings—a plan first suggested over 20 years ago by now-Senator Elizabeth Warren. Here, Thakor’s just-as-easy-to-comprehend take on five big money questions. Read More

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Outsmart the “Lady Upcharge”

Remodel woes illustrationBy Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer, Philadelphia Inquirer

The “lady upcharge.”

Ever face it when negotiating prices? It’s when repairmen and contractors charge women more—in this case, for home-improvement projects. Read More

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Buying a Home? 5 Must-Do’s for Women

Bazemore, TeresaBy Teresa Bryce Bazemore, President, Radian Guaranty, Inc.

One of my biggest accomplishments was buying my first home—a condo in Columbia, Maryland.

My parents helped me with the down payment since I had been out of law school for only a couple of years.  I got a Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loan with a nine percent interest rate. I was ecstatic! Read More

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